Connecticut

NIFA Supports Disaster Education through EDEN

USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) supports disaster education through the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN).

ePaint Serving Biofouling Solutions

ePaint is a company located in East Falmouth, Massachusetts, that has received support from the NIFA’s Small Business Innovation Research program (SBIR).

'Functional Ice' Shows Food Industry How to Keep Cool and Reduce Loss

Over 133 billion pounds of food per year is lost due to waste at different stages in the farm-to-fork continuum.

Strengthening Connecticut Farms

In response to training needs of new farmers, University of Connecticut (UConn) Extension launched its Solid Ground Farmer Training Program.

CT191

Students Trained in Seafood Safety

Specially trained seafood handlers will eliminate risk of contamination or hazards that could cause illness.

Capacity Funding Power

NIFA released a new report that measures the effectiveness of its investments to our nation’s land-grant universities — investments that benefit the American public through agriculture and food research, extension, and education projects.

Good and Bad Worms

To assist farmers, producers, crop advisors, and others interested in learning more about managing parasitic worms, the Multistate Research Fund, a NIFA initiative to foster collaboration among universities, has implemented a project to provide simple, low-cost tools and methods for effectively managing nematodes and protecting soil health.

The Coast is Clear

At the Universities of Connecticut and Rhode Island, a team of Extension and Sea Grant educators is addressing coastal preparedness with funding from the Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program. UConn Extension has created a preparedness education program to help people, including those with pets and livestock, prepare for storm emergencies.

A Multistate Hive Mind of Research

Bees provide essential pollination for many of the nut, berry, fruit, vegetable, and seed crops grown in the U.S. To supplement wild bee pollination, farmers often rent managed honey bee colonies. Demand is skyrocketing, but catastrophic die-offs are threatening the supply of healthy honey bee colonies.