Vermont

Video Games Offer Clues to Help Curb Animal Disease Outbreaks

As Asia and Europe battle African swine fever outbreaks, University of Vermont (UVM) research shows how farmers’ risk attitudes affect the spread of infectious animal diseases and offers a first-of-its kind model for testing disease control and prevention strategies.

Slowing the Spread of EAB in Vermont

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive insect that kills 99 percent of the North American ash trees it infects.

Increasing Ecosystem Services and Climate Change Resilience in Dominant Agroecosystems of the Northeast

Climate change is demanding that we find new ways to adapt agricultural systems to remain profitable, curb environmental impacts, and minimize their contributions to greenhouse gas emissions.

Dewing Right for Food Storage

​$10,000 a year. That’s the amount of money Chris Callahan, University of Vermont (UVM) Extension agricultural engineer, predicts his invention could save artisanal cheese and meat producers.

Capacity Funding Power

NIFA released a new report that measures the effectiveness of its investments to our nation’s land-grant universities — investments that benefit the American public through agriculture and food research, extension, and education projects.

Good and Bad Worms

To assist farmers, producers, crop advisors, and others interested in learning more about managing parasitic worms, the Multistate Research Fund, a NIFA initiative to foster collaboration among universities, has implemented a project to provide simple, low-cost tools and methods for effectively managing nematodes and protecting soil health.

What Wild Bees Need

A new national assessment estimates that wild bees declined in 23 percent of the contiguous United States between 2008 and 2013. The team of Project ICP researchers, led by Insu Koh at the University of Vermont, found that the decline was generally associated with conversion of natural habitats to row crops. Areas of intense agriculture (e.g., the Midwest Corn Belt and the Central Valley of California) have among the lowest levels of predicted wild bee abundance.

60,000 Have Been Impacted by Beginning Farmer Programs

A new report, "Cultivating the Next Generation," examines the impact of USDA’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP), the only federal program explicitly dedicated to training the next generation of farmers.

Improving Fine Wine Grapes

Grapes are the highest-value fruit crop grown in the United States.

Brewers, Bakers, and Safe Local Grains

The University of Vermont Extension’s (UVM) Northwest Crops and Soils Program created the Cereal Grain Quality Testing Laboratory in 2010 in response to this growing demand